Types of Psoriatic Arthritis | Psoriatic Arthritis Types of Psoriatic Arthritis | Psoriatic Arthritis
Image of hand touching elbow

Types of Psoriatic Arthritis

Different people experience Psoriatic Arthritis in different ways – some may experience stiffness and pain in both hands or both feet; others may experience pain in their back mostly. Researchers have noticed however, that there seems to be patterns of shared symptoms among people with Psoriatic Arthritis. Below are the five most common types of PsA:

Symmetric polyarthritis.

One of the most common types of PsA. As the name suggests, the arthritis affects the same joints on both sides of the body (e.g., right and left wrist; right and left shoulder, etc).

Distal interphalangeal predominant.

Joints at the end of fingers and toes are affected; often, there are also changes to the nails (pitting, lifting of nail from bed).

Arthritis mutilans.

A rare form of PsA, arthritis mutilans affects the hands and feet. Severe inflammation can result in joint destruction and problems with movement.

Asymmetric oligoarticular.

Another common type of PsA. People with asymmetric PsA usually have 1-4 joints affected on either side of the body; the joints do not necessarily have to be the same on either side.

Spondylitis.

Joints in between the vertebrae of the spine are affected. As a result, pain and stiffness can be felt in the neck and back. Other joints in the arms, legs, feet and hands may also be affected.

Do any of these PsA types sound familiar to you? Take our 30-second Psoriatic Arthritis quiz to see if you may have PsA.
Do any of these PsA types sound familiar to you? Take our 30-second Psoriatic Arthritis quiz to see if you may have PsA.
TAKE OUR 30-SECOND QUIZ
RÉPONDRE AU QUESTIONNAIRE DE 30 SECONDES
START

Early Treatment Can Make a Difference

Because PsA is a chronic (ongoing) and progressive condition, treating it sooner rather than later can have long-term benefits. The inflammation from PsA can destroy joints permanently, so it’s important to help slow or prevent this process with appropriate treatment. Equally important, proper treatment can help manage symptoms such as pain, stiffness and fatigue, and improve quality of life.

Early detection and appropriate treatment can be key to slowing or helping prevent joint damage.